shootinfoot

This is part B of the 10 Ways To Programaticly Shoot Yourself In The Foot article. As I already stated in part A, there are several things a software developer can do to make his life much more difficult in the future. In this article I will talk about another 5 issues that even the best developers have to be aware of. In other words, I will try to prevent you from programaticly shooting yourself in the foot.


  • Use The Wrong Access Modifiers 

There are four access modifiers: public, protected, internal and private. Don’t use public everywhere you can! Choose the correct access modifier!…


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The thirteen post of the series of programming job interview challenge is out, Only 13 comments with answers were provided to job interview challenge #12. This is a small amount comparing to the previous challenges, but I realize and understand that it was language specific and not very trivial challenge…

Jason Kikel was the first one to solve the question, and here is his short answer:

UnmanagedClass is referencing an address on ManagedClass without pinning it. The ManagedClass instance needs to be pinned so the GC won’t move it to another location during a collection.


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The twelfth post of the series of programming job interview challenge is out, 28 readers provided answers to job interview challenge #11. I have to admit that I probably failed explaining what I was looking for in challenge #11, because I asked you to provide the best algorithm in both manners: performance and memory. What I really meant is that performance is most important but don’t neglect the memory issue. Due to my little “embarrassing failure”, there are two groups of correct answers – the performance oriented and the memory oriented.

The correct answer which I was looking for (best at performance) as Alex, the first one to provide a detailed solution (its two times in a row), wrote:


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We all know managed code can have memory leaks. You can find a good example here: A .NET memory leak you did not think about. Microsoft provides us with the CLR Profiler, an open source tool for analyzing the behavior of your managed application, which you can download here. It contains very good documentation about the different functions of the tool, however I still find it a bit hard to start with, so here is a simple step-by-step example of how to use it. After you finish downloadoing it , extract the files and open the directory. there you will find the manual, you can read it later… Navigate to CLRProfiler\Binaries\x86 (or x64) and run CLRProfiler.exe.


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