Hi

 

Where do you locate your convertors? do you put them in the Window.Resources section? or in the UserControl they are being used for? Neither of these options is good. You should put it in the App.Xaml file and here is why:

Lets look at the following example:

Here is our Window:

   1: <Window x:Class="ConvertorLocation.Window1"
   2:     xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
   3:     xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
   4:         xmlns:my="clr-namespace:ConvertorLocation"
   5:     Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300">
   6:     <Grid>
   7:         <ItemsControl ItemsSource="{Binding}">
   8:             <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
   9:                 <DataTemplate>
  10:                     <my:UserControl1></my:UserControl1>
  11:                 </DataTemplate>
  12:             </ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
  13:         </ItemsControl>
  14:     </Grid>    
  15: </Window>

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Hi

In my previous post about WPF Binding Converters one of our readers (Thanks The Reddest) pointed our that a new converter instance is not created every time a call is made to the converter. I promised to test it again so here goes :)
I used the old converter code but added a static integer inside the converter to count the number of calls made to it. and then printed it out to the trace in the constructor.


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Hi all

As you all remember in my article about Custom WPF Context Menu I mentioned that my WPF Binding Converter was a singleton, and I promised to tell you why, so here comes the 3 ways I know of using WPF Binding Converters. We will start from the worst (in my opinion) and move on the the best.

To start off here is the Binding Converter:


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How would you like your WPF application to have a Context Menu like this:

Context Menu Example

Well, It is not so hard. Here is how you do it:


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