Hey all,

 

a while back we had 2 great posts and one page about visual studio shortcuts. The first one had a list of 10 Visual Studio Shortcuts and the second one had 11 Visual Studio Shortcuts. We also have a Visual Studio CheatSheet with all the Keyboard shortcuts Visual Studio has.

 

Here is another list of 5 Shortcuts I have picked up along the way.

 


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Hi

 

I wanted to show the usage of these two very useful debugger attributes. If you don’t know them keep on reading, they are very useful.

 

DebuggerDisplay

This attribute allows you to customize the way an object is displayed. lets look at the following example:


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bugs

We all know what breakpoints are, they tell the debugger that an application should break and pause execution, at a certain point. If we want to get certain information at this point, we need to copy it down to a paper or to the notepad. There are breakpoints which get hit hundred of times during the execution of a program, so it may be very exhausting to write down the breakpoint information each time it is hit. Well, last week, while I saw John Cunninghams session at PDC 2008 about Visual Studio Debugger Tips & Tricks, I learned something new. The Visual Studio debugger has another feature called tracepoints.


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From Wikipedia: “A deadlock is a situation wherein two or more competing actions are waiting for the other to finish, and thus neither ever does”. Deadlocks are terribly difficult to find and even more difficult to debug. Debug Inspector is a free tool that allows you to view the call stacks of multiple threads at the same time, plugs in to the internals of the CLR and automatically detects deadlocks.

 

The most powerful feature of this tool is that it works on both managed and unmanaged code. It is actually a Visual Studio extension which can be used to detect managed deadlocks and a standalone executable to detect unmanaged deadlocks. Besides detecting deadlocks, there are more features to this tool:


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For the last month, I was working on an imagery infrastructure library. Some of my effort was to well document each class, method and property so that the users of this library will have the privilege of knowing how to properly use it. During the development phase, I created a test project so I will be able to test my code at runtime. By the end of this month, I decided to separate the test project from the main solution and create a test solution. Surprisingly, when browsing the test code and hovering my library classes and methods, no comments appeared in the Visual Studio tooltip:

image

Those comments did appear when the test and the imagery infrastructure projects belonged to the same solution. On In this article, I am going to explain why it is so important to generate XML documentation file for each one of your .Net projects.


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PHP for Visual Studio This is something for all you .NET developers who have a WordPress blog which is in PHP and some time you need to do some PHP work (Like me). Or if you just want to work with PHP on your Visual Studio 2008/2005. jcxsoftware have developed such a Visual Studio Plugin.

It supports PHP4 and PHP5, you will also get Syntax highlighting and Intelisense for the following:


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Last week a co worker of mine who wanted to remain anonymous, ran into the weirdest problem. She tried to use the “find in files” option in Visual Studio 2005 and even though the searched expression was out there in one of the files, she got the following result: “No files were found to look in. Find was stopped in progress.”

You can close Visual Studio, restart your computer or jump three times on one leg, but the problem remains. This is a very strange and odd bug, but fortunately there is a solution: press…


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todo-list How many times did you write a TODO comment in your code? How many times did you forget about this comment and met it again only some months later? It happens a lot to most of the developers who eventually tends to write their TODO missions on some papers, notepad or a ToDoList application. From what I know, most software developers are not aware of the fact that they can view all of their TODO comments in one list.


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We never published a lists of blog posts we liked, so this will be the first time. I gathered some links from my Google Reader shared items, some of those links are old, some are new, but I liked them all. So here is the list of 7 post/articles I recommend:

  1. Phil Haack is talking about the fact that The Design Is Never Right The First Time. I think that it is OK that the design won’t be right the first time, but it should be good at the first time. Explanation: the fact that Phil could change the implementation over night tells me that his initial design was very good. It is not that simple to change the design and the implementation so close to the deadline… I know some projects where you can’t replace some code just like that, it will take too much time to do it…
  2. Scott Hanselman tells that there is a post at the Microsoft StyleCop blog that shows some rules about directives outside and inside the namespace declaration. In his post Back to Basics – Do namespace using directives affect Assembly Loading?, he discovers that we shouldn’t believe everything we read, even on a Microsoft Blog.
  3. Jeff Atwood wrote about Dealing With Bad Apples in a team and that if you tolerate even one developer whom the other developers think is a problem, you’ll hurt the morale of the good developers. I totally agree, those situations lead to a very negative attitude in the team and after some time, it is too late because the “cancer” has spread to the whole team.

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When we work on big projects, there is a need to set up a development tree (directory structure) and not just put everything in the bin\Debug or bin\Release folder. There are some “how to set up a good development tree” best practices and even a .NET development tree generator called Tree Surgeon. Some of the folders in this directory structure shall be “Resources” (set of icons and images) and “Config” (set of configuration files).

How many times did you search for a specific configuration file or a specific icon in the development tree (assuming it is a big one)? You come back to a component you wrote several years ago and can’t recall where did you locate your files. Wouldn’t it be nice if for each project, our resources and configuration files could be seen form visual studio? We would never need to find them using the windows explorer anymore and we will always have them right there even when coming back to a code which was written 2-3 years ago.


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